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Regular Visitor
Tiger_Crocs
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎09-29-2012
0

Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

We finally got the house.  I wish I were more excited.  The first thing we did before moving is was to upgrade the electrical.  It needed to be up to code and grounded.  We got in done by a licensed electrician; however we felt something was wrong.  The day after he finished (and I had already paid him) we called the city to get a copy of the permit only to discover he never pulled a permit.

 

We called him directly and asked him to pull a permit.  He was very nonchalant, but agreed to it.  We had the city inspection scheduled already.  He cancelled it because he says he wants to be there when the inspection takes place, so he said he'll schedule the inspection for next week.

 

I realize my mistakes in retrospect. I should have asked for that permit before I even cut him a check.  How can I avoid future mistakes with this guy or any other electrician?  For some reason, if it does not pass inspection, is he legally obligated to fix it so it does pass?  Will he charge us?  He's already charged us a large amount.

 

Furthermore, we know the permit costs a little over $100 to pull.  He said it costs him $400.

Any help truly appreciated.

 

Thanks. 

 

 

Silver Trusted Contributor
HarryV
Posts: 827
Registered: ‎03-20-2008
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

I hate to break this to you but there is a really high liklihood he is not a licensed electrician. Did you actually see his license and check his ID? There is absolutely no reason for a licensed contractor to not get a permit from the city.

Regular Visitor
Tiger_Crocs
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎09-29-2012
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

[ Edited ]

Thanks for the reply.  We tried to pull permit ourselves, but the city said only the technician could pull it.  And he did pull it after we asked him, because he gave us a copy of the permit.  So could an unlicensed electrician still pull a permit?  As long as he did the work he is the only one who could pull it, whether he is licensed or not?

 

We got his name from Angie's list.  He has a licensed number there, but I just check with Angies List FAQ and it stated that it is up to the client to verify the license is still valid.

 

Lesson learned the hard way.  Thanks again for reply.

Super Contributor
inspector_guy
Posts: 317
Registered: ‎01-02-2010
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

"I realize my mistakes in retrospect. I should have asked for that permit before I even cut him a check.  How can I avoid future mistakes with this guy or any other electrician?  For some reason, if it does not pass inspection, is he legally obligated to fix it so it does pass?  Will he charge us?  He's already charged us a large amount.

 

Furthermore, we know the permit costs a little over $100 to pull.  He said it costs him $400."

 

Great and helpful information can be found at https://www2.cslb.ca.gov/OnlineServices/CheckLicenseII/checklicense.aspx

Always hold back 10% or more until the job is finished and the municipal inspector has passed the work. Yes, the electrical contractor is obligated to make corrections if his work fails to pass (unless there is a stipulation in your/his contract for unforseen circumstances).

 

From the Contractor State License Board:

 

What to include in a contract

A contract should contain everything agreed upon by you and your licensed contractor. It should detail the work, price, when payments will be made, who gets the necessary building permits, and when the job will be finished. The contract also must identify the contractor, and give his/her address and license number. A good contract also has warnings and notices about the right to cancel, mechanics liens, and allowable delays.

 

Reminder symbolREMEMBER

  • Get it in writing. Since a written contract protects both you and the contractor, all agreements should be put in writing. It should be as specific as possible regarding all materials to be used, such as the quality, quantity, weight, color, size, or brand name as it may apply. For example, the contract should read "install oak kitchen cabinets, manufactured by Company XYZ, model 01381A, as per the plan," not just "install kitchen cabinets."
  • Don't sign anything until you understand the contract and agree to the terms. Anything you sign as authorization to move forward with the project could become the contract. Ask questions until you understand and agree to all the terms before signing. You also may wish to review the proposed contract with an attorney.
  • Make sure the contract includes everything that is agreed to, up to and including complete cleanup and removal of debris and materials, along with special requests like saving lumber for firewood or saving certain materials or appliances. Also give instructions regarding pets, children or areas where materials may not be stored.
  • Never sign a blank or partially blank contract. Once you sign, both you and the contractor are bound by everything set down in the contract. Make sure to get a copy of the contract, and keep it for your records.
  • Always update your contract. Even after you have signed the contract and the work already has begun, you may want to make some changes. If you have added or subtracted work, substituted materials or equipment, changed the completion date, etc., make sure to note it in writing on a "change order," and include any price changes. After a change order is signed, it becomes part of the written contract.
  • For swimming pools, make sure that you receive a Checklist for Homeowners - Swimming Pool. One must be provided in the contract, as well as a plan and scale drawing showing the shape, size dimensions, and construction and equipment specifications. You may wish to refer to Swimming Pool Construction for more information.
  • Make sure your cancellation is in writing. You may cancel within three (3) days of signing a contract, but it must be mailed before midnight of the third day.
  • Make sure the financial terms are clear. The contract should include the total price, when payments will be made, and whether there is a cancellation penalty. You should expect to make a down payment on any home improvement job. That down payment should never exceed 10 percent of the contract price or $1,000, whichever is less.
Silver Regular Contributor
Fishmarty
Posts: 681
Registered: ‎08-25-2012
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

Last time we had tree service contractor to cut a large tree in the back yard, we did what exactly inspector_guy did: went to the state license website to key in contractor's name to check license number, owner, valid period of the license, insurance, bond, working compensation... etc before we signed the contract.

 

The work didn't require a permit but we concerned about safety.

 

Yeah need to do lots of searches and confirmations to save tons of troubles latter on.

 

It is so easy, though, with this internet that you can find out everything (almost) you want to know. Nowadays people and offices are so used to post all critical information onto the webs...

 

 


inspector_guy wrote:

 

Great and helpful information can be found at https://www2.cslb.ca.gov/OnlineServices/CheckLicenseII/checklicense.aspx

 


 

Silver Trusted Contributor
HarryV
Posts: 827
Registered: ‎03-20-2008
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

Seems like you really avoided a serious disaster! Hopefully your inspection passes :smileyhappy: Also, never pay in full. You are entitled to withold I think up to 20% in payment even after all work has been done.

Super Contributor
brandonbw
Posts: 225
Registered: ‎03-20-2012
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

We had ours electrical redone and our electrician gave us the option of permit or not.  We replaced all knob and tube and figured the $300 extra wasn't a lot to have it done right.  He said either way it would be going in right, so let him know.  Passed on the first inspection.  He told us that whoever signs for the permit must be present when the inspector arrives.

 

I would hold a certain amount of money until everything is done according to the contract.  Much more incentive to get it all done.  You know you can also look up the permit costs online and ballpark his figure.  Ours was a full rewire for 2 bed 2 baths 1200 sq. ft. house.  $300 seemed reasonable to me since the inspector has to drive to and from the house on his workday along with all the paperwork that we love in this country.

Regular Visitor
Tiger_Crocs
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎09-29-2012
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

Thank you inspector guy and others,

 

I checked his license.  Can you believe it's actually valid?  Wow. 

 

We are still looking for another electrician, and other service people, like contractors, etc.  Does anyone know of a local forum like this one for home improvements?

 

We've been using Angie's lists, but it's just reviews.  Is there a discussion forum out there?

 

Thanks so much and Merry Christmas!

 

Tiger

Platinum Super Contributor
Nanomug
Posts: 10,370
Registered: ‎05-30-2009
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

It's my understanding that by law up to 10% can be held back at the end of the job.  It is then up to the homeowner to verify that the job was done.  If the job is done the homeowner pays within 10 days.  

 


HarryV wrote:

Seems like you really avoided a serious disaster! Hopefully your inspection passes :smileyhappy: Also, never pay in full. You are entitled to withold I think up to 20% in payment even after all work has been done.




Super Contributor
brandonbw
Posts: 225
Registered: ‎03-20-2012
0

Re: Electrical upgrade with permits and city inspection

We used H N Electric, based in Fontana, but does a lot of work in the LA area, for our rewire.  I wrote a really nice review for him on Angies List as he was by far the best person we used to work on our house.  I really appreciate when people go the extra distance with what they say they will do.  He went way beyond what the original quote was for and charged us a couple hundred more for a lot of extra work we ended up doing.  If we can PM on here I can go into more detail.  It seems like some of the higher rated places on Angies List seem a bit suspect when we got quotes and heard their speal.  The company we used for the sewer lateral was pretty good, just needed some serious negotiating down in price.

 

We also used some people we found based on flyers in our mail and had very mixed results.

 

I was using diychatroom to ask lots of questions during our painting and refinishing floor portion.  Which turned into problem after problem.